Q- Are we being 'British' ?

VW Campervan Subcultures PHD Research Project By Sharon Wilson. A Self Confessed VW Fanatic

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Postby maud » Tue Mar 18, 2014 2:52 pm

Hello People, Would you believe I am still doing this godforsaken PHD ha ha.

Latest question. Despite it being German originally, do you think that owners feel they are enjoying englishness and British heritage by buying a VW campervan and going to festivals in it?

I know I haven't been on the forum for a long time but is would be fab if I got a few responses to this. :rolf:

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Postby dustrat » Tue Mar 18, 2014 4:00 pm

Well Sharon,being nearly 3 score and ten years old I have seen various British 'camper' in my time, Commer's, Transit's and Bedford's to mention a few and they have all corroded away and the engines were rubbish. The VW camper has stood the test of time. The shape has changed very little ,a few improvements to running gear and engine but basically the same as origionally designed and easy to maintain.There's a saying 'If it aint broke dont fix it' It does not matter where it was made as long as it is reasonably reliable. Again does not matter where you go on this planet I'm sure you will find a VW camper of some sort !!

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Postby The Lockkeeper » Tue Mar 18, 2014 4:05 pm

I think they're awfully British.
and I'm sure that Hans thinks they're very German, and Bruce thinks they're very Australian and Hank (?) Thinks they're very American, etc. Etc.
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Then always be Batman....


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Postby maud » Tue Mar 18, 2014 5:21 pm

Cool answer but why do you think their British? :lol:
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Postby tudor rose bugger » Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:26 pm

The Lockkeeper wrote:I think they're awfully British.
and I'm sure that Hans thinks they're very German, and Bruce thinks they're very Australian and Hank (?) Thinks they're very American, etc. Etc.



HANK !!! Really grant was that the best yank you could come up with :roll: back of the class for you :rolf:
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Postby maud » Wed Mar 19, 2014 8:46 am

Hey Tudor rose :D

Please can you add something.....do you think we are celebrating
Englishness via the van? Icecream vans also seem very brit lo.

?

Xxx
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Postby dustrat » Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:19 pm

'Just one more Cornetto' Me thinks you are being a 'Worky Ticket' :rolf: :rolf: :rolf: :rolf: :rolf:
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Postby Lee C » Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:32 pm

Yeah Tudor rose your not taking this seriously :P :x
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Postby tudor rose bugger » Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:45 am

:oops: sorry I will try better
Last edited by tudor rose bugger on Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
Carl and nicola


www.Classic-campers.org & www.classicices.com Image

my rides
2010 T5.1 sexy black, 68 bay tintop, 72 bay now Tintop, 69 bug, 71 bug, 63 type 3, and now a bloody 64 splitty also a 70's mrs c but hopefully not the same one as another member on here ??
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Postby tudor rose bugger » Thu Mar 20, 2014 10:45 am

British hmmm ?? So where did it all start !!

Legend has all sorts of fanciful stories about Marco Polo bringing ice cream from China and Catherine de' Medici introducing it to France and King Charles I having his own personal ice cream maker; all wonderful stories, but sadly there is not a scrap of historic evidence to back up any of these legends. Marco Polo didn't introduce either ice cream or pasta to Europe and worse still, he probably never even went to China. Most of these myths seem to have been introduced by the Victorians.

The earliest evidence of anything approaching ice cream being made was in China in the Tang period (A.D. 618-907). Buffalo, cows' and goats' milk was heated and allowed to ferment. This 'yoghurt' was then mixed with flour for thickening, camphor (yes camphor!) for flavour and 'refrigerated' before being served. King Tang of Shang had a staff of 2,271 people which included 94 ice-men.

The early methods of freezing food need some explanation. Freezing of foods was achieved by mixing salt with ice. Mixing salt with ice reduces the freezing point and it is quite easy to achieve temperatures lower than -14C. Just who discovered the process is unknown, but it was probably invented by the Chinese. It was written about in India in the 4th century, and the first technical description of ice making using various salts was by an Arab medical historian Ibn Abu Usaybi (A.D. 1230-1270).

But the process did not arrive in Europe until 1503, in Italy where it was considered a chemists party trick, using various acids, water and salts. However, it was not used for food until water ices (sorbets) appeared in the 1660s in Naples, Florence, Paris and Spain. Later in 1664 ices made with sweetened milk first appeared in Naples.

In this country Ice Cream was served at a banquet for the Feast of St. George at Windsor Castle in 1671. It was such a rare and exotic dish that only the guests on King Charles II's table had 'one plate of white strawberries and one plate of iced cream.' All the other guests had to watch and marvel at what the Royal table were eating.

Such was the interest and demand for ice cream that wealthy people built ice houses on their estates. Ice, 'farmed' in winter from lakes, ponds and rivers was stored under straw and bark, until the summer when it was used for cooling drinks, making water ices and 'iced creams'. The ice was of such a poor quality that it was never actually put in food, it was only ever used to chill and freeze food and drinks.

Ice cream making was a closely guarded secret and the knowledge of how to make it would have been a meal ticket for life, which is why the first recipe in English did not appear until 1718.

The technique of making a custard based ice cream using egg yolks started in France around the middle of the 18th century and this is the origin of custard based ice cream. The Americans had to wait until 1800 to get their first taste of ice cream.

In the 19th century, ice cream manufacture was simplified with the introduction of the ice cream machine in 1843 in both England and America. This consisted of a wooden bucket that was filled with ice and salt and had a handle which rotated. The central metal container, containing the ice cream was surrounded the salt and ice mixture. This churning produced ice cream with an even, smooth texture. Previously it was made in a pewter pot kept in a bucket of ice and salt and had to be regularly hand stirred and scraped from the side of the pewter pots with a 'spaddle' which is a sort of miniature spade on a long handle.

The key factor in the manufacture of ice cream was ice. Where was it to come from? In the early 19th century importation of ice started from Norway, Canada and America, this made ice cream readily available to the general public in the UK. Ice was shipped into London and other major ports and taken in canal barges down the canals, to be stored in ice houses, from where it was sold to ice cream makers. This burgeoning ice cream industry, run mainly by Italians, started the influx of workers from southern Italy and the Ticino area of Switzerland to England.

In London they lived in the most appalling conditions in and around the Holborn area. The huge ice house pits built near Kings Cross by Carlo Gatti in the 1850s, where he stored the ice he shipped to England from Norway, are still there and have recently been opened to the public at The London Canal Museum.

The advent of mechanical refrigeration using electricity and gas, at the end of the last century, is what made the ice cream industry what it is today. No longer were huge quantities of ice necessary and it was now possible to transport and store ice cream. Previously ice cream had to be eaten within a few hours of it being made as it required too much ice to keep it frozen. Ice cream quickly became a mass market product and many of the old flavours became best sellers. It is an interesting point that most of the flavours heralded as 'new inventions' by the go-go chefs, can all be found in the history of ice cream.

What about the cone?

Most people think of the cone or cornet as the traditional way of eating ice cream and until recently it was claimed in the United States to be an American invention dating from the 1904 St Louis World Fair.

Our recent research has shown that the ice cream cone was an English invention. Although the cone itself can be traced back hundreds of years, the first recording of cones being used for serving ice cream was in 1888 in Mrs Marshall's Cookery Book. Prior to that ice cream was either licked out of a small glass known as a penny lick or taken away wrapped in waxed paper referred to as a hokey pokey (hokey pokey is supposed to have come from the Italian 'ecco un poco' 'here is a little'). An American government official said in 1969 that “The ice cream cone is the only ecologically sound package known. It is the perfect package.”

So although WE the British may not have invented ice cream we may have invented the cone, and Margaret thatcher may have promoted ice cream back in the day and it survived that kiss of death, so ice cream is stronger than coal !!

Also as the the inventors of the ice-cream cone, the american government has approved us as Eco warriors, so that also goes hand in hand with vw campers, so brings me back to the question in hand.


YES

I do believe we are being terribly British.

Author

Carlo Cummings ice cream vendor extraordinaire



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Carl and nicola


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my rides
2010 T5.1 sexy black, 68 bay tintop, 72 bay now Tintop, 69 bug, 71 bug, 63 type 3, and now a bloody 64 splitty also a 70's mrs c but hopefully not the same one as another member on here ??
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Postby dustrat » Thu Mar 20, 2014 11:07 am

You've started some thing now Sharon !!!!!!!! cheers cheers cheers cheers
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Postby Lee C » Thu Mar 20, 2014 12:48 pm

Much better 10 out of 10!!!!!!!!! :D :D :D :D
Lee

Current rides, 1996 mk3 golf GTi, 1972 bay crossover deluxe westy Berlin , 1980's Mrs C, beat that!!!!

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Postby The Lockkeeper » Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:40 pm

I agree with what Carl said, but about campervans...
Always be yourself.
Unless you can be Batman.
Then always be Batman....


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Postby COVIN » Fri Mar 21, 2014 8:30 am

A very British reply Carl :D
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Postby maddison » Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:35 am

....i think it would be more interesting to define what you mean by British and how that would be different from someone from another country enjoying a classic vehicle

Classic vehicles do come from a time when the british where more 'british' I guess, shirt & tie for all occassions, mother at home looking after the children, jobs for everyone, more tea vicar, queens english, etcetc


just like grant said earlier really
they 'may' make you feel more british...if you are british, and more german if your german

So driving one now , may make you feel more british (i.e from an bygone period), but you really have to ask what thats all about...not whether the vehicle is making it happen
wearing a tweed 3 piece suit probably makes you feel more british too.....but do Idahoes ? i doubt it

If you really wanna feel british, you need to be driving a vintage british vehicle....or british version of a VW camper (i try to make all the accesories for my bus british...as thats where its from and what it would have had 'back in the day'
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